Hello Drama Aficionados! Welcome to your senior year. I hope you had a fantastic summer. This is the online notes platform we will be using all year. All notes and assessments will be posted here in inverse chronological order, listing future dates at the top and our first day of class at the bottom. You should think of this notes page as the "schedule" part of your course syllabus. You are responsible for everything listed here, even and especially if you've decided not to read it.


11/27:  Bring your hard copy of Unsworth to class.  

11/26:  Bring your hard copy of Unsworth to class.  Be prepared for a written reading quiz on p. 259-336 in Unsworth's The Songs of the Kings

11/25:  Bring your hard copy of Unsworth to class.  Extra help will occur from 11:40-12 in W110a.  When you arrive in class, you should have finished reading p. 259-336 in Unsworth's The Songs of the Kings.   If you ask good questions about the reading, I will delay the quiz until 11/26.  If you ask no questions, you will have the quiz today. 

11/22:  Bring your hard copy of Unsworth to class.

11/21:  Bring your hard copy of Unsworth to class.

11/20:  Bring your hard copy of Unsworth to class.

11/19:  Bring your hard copy of Unsworth to class.

11/18:  Bring your hard copy of Unsworth to class.  Discuss the origin of Cassandra's powers (lines 1,414-33; p. 45-47) in Aeschylus's drama, Agamemnon.

11/15:  Bring your hard copy of Unsworth to class.  Be prepared for a written reading quiz on p. 199-258 in Unsworth's The Songs of the Kings

11/14:  Bring your hard copy of Unsworth to class.  Extra help will occur from 11:40-12 in W110a.  When you arrive in class, you should have finished reading p. 199-258 in Unsworth's The Songs of the Kings.   If you ask good questions about the reading, I will delay the quiz until 11/15.  If you ask no questions, you will have the quiz today. 

11/13:  Bring your hard copy of Unsworth to class.  Discuss Clytemnestra's prayer to Zeus (lines 151-53; p. 37) and Clytemnestra's and the chorus's confrontation with Cassandra (lines 1,217-1,357; p. 38-43) in Aeschylus's drama, Agamemnon.

11/12:  Bring your hard copy of Unsworth to class.  Discuss the public marriage spat between Agamemnon and Clytemnestra in Aeschylus's drama, Agamemnon:  (line 1,001-1,132; p. 31-36). 

11/8:  Bring Adaptation Essay 1 and your hard copy of Unsworth to class.

11/7:  Bring Adaptation Essay 1 and your hard copy of Unsworth to class.

Optional, Unsworth Evidence Gathering Assignment (due on turnitin.com by 8AM on Thursday, 11/7):  In response to a student request, I am offering an optional homework assignment for those of you who would like to add to your total points with an effort-based assessment. The assignment is worth 25 points, and if you do an excellent job on it, I may give you more than 25 points (i.e., 27/25). Should you choose to do this optional assignment, you must post it on Turnitin.com by Thursday, 11/7 before 8AM. The directions for the assignment and its submission are as follows. Assignment Directions: For this assignment, you will gather A MINIMUM OF 4 quotations that you would offer in support of EACH OF THE 2 topic sentences below, and accompanying (1) each quotation you should (2) provide a page number and (3) respond in 3 to 4 COMPLETE AND CORRECT SENTENCES IN EXPLANATION of the literary devices the author uses in your chosen example to support the point stated in the topic sentence. Ultimately, you should provide A MINIMUM OF 8 QUOTATIONS (4 for each topic sentence), 8 PAGE NUMBERS, AND 8 EXPLANATIONS OF 3-4 SENTENCES OR MORE. The topic sentences your examples will support are as follows. Topic Sentence 1: In “The Heavy Burden of Command,” part one of The Songs of the Kings, Unsworth uses direct and indirect characterization to portray Agamemnon’s initial furious resistance to Croton’s claim that the king’s daughter should be killed in a ritual sacrifice to appease Zeus. Topic Sentence 2: However, in the final chapter of “The Heavy Burden of Command” and in the chapters that follow, Unsworth uses the same literary devices to show that Agamemnon gradually chooses his war, his soldiers and himself over his daughter’s life, resorting to rationalizations, consolations and deceptions in an effort to maintain power. Submission Directions: I am requiring you to submit this assignment on Turnitin.com to assure that you are not copying from each other. You can have similar quotes to other students, as you are all seeking evidence in the same text, but if your explanations are flagged for plagiarism, you will receive a zero on this assignment as well as an honor code violation. If you are in my A period class, your turnitin.com Enrollment Key is DRAMAA and your Class ID is 22837429. If you are in my C period class, your turnitin.com Enrollment Key is DRAMAC and your Class ID is 22837439. If you are in my F period class, your turnitin.com Enrollment Key is DRAMAF and your Class ID is 22837445.

11/6:  Bring your hard copy of Unsworth to class. Be prepared for an 80-point scantron reading quiz on p. 1-198 in Unsworth's The Songs of the Kings.  To prepare for this quiz, go to "Files," open the "Unsworth Quiz 1 Study Guide," and study not only the facts on the page but also the pages in Unsworth and the lines in Aeschylus that I have noted for each character.

11/5:  Bring your hard copy of Unsworth to class.  Be prepared for a written reading quiz on p. 137-198 in Unsworth's The Songs of the Kings

11/4:  Bring your hard copy of Unsworth to class.  Extra help will occur from 11:40-12 in W110a.  When you arrive in class, you should have finished reading p. 137-198 in Unsworth's The Songs of the Kings.   If you ask good questions about the reading, I will delay the quiz until 11/5.  If you ask no questions, you will have the quiz today. 

10/30:  Bring your hard copy of Unsworth to class.

10/29:  Bring your hard copy of Unsworth to class.  Discuss Aeschylus's drama, Agamemnon:  The Chorus speaks and Agamemnon arrives home (line 924ff; p. 29ff). 

10/28:  Bring your hard copy of Unsworth to class.  Discuss Aeschylus's drama, Agamemnon: The Herald arrives (lines 599-643; p. 20-21); Clytaemnestra comments on the Herald's arrival and the Herald and the Chorus Leader converse (lines 699-756; p. 23-25).

10/25:  Bring your hard copy of Unsworth to class.  

10/24:  Discuss the optional Unsworth Evidence Gathering Homework assignment that students must submit on turnitin.com by 8AM on Thursday, 11/7.  Today you will have a chance to either begin work on this assignment or begin the Unsworth reading assignment that is due on Monday, 11/4.

10/23:  Bring your hard copy of Unsworth to class.  Be prepared for a written reading quiz on p. 95-136 in Unsworth's The Songs of the Kings

10/22:  Bring your hard copy of Unsworth to class.  Extra help will occur from 11:40-12 in W110a.  When you arrive in class, you should have finished reading p. 95-136 in Unsworth's The Songs of the Kings.   If you ask good questions about the reading, I will delay the quiz until 10/23.  If you ask no questions, you will have the quiz today. 

10/21:  Bring your hard copy of Unsworth to class.  Discuss Aeschylus's drama, Agamemnon:  The Chorus comments on the two eagles, the pregnant hare, and the sacrifice to Artemis (lines 124-188; p. 6-8); the Chorus also comments on Agamemnon's and Iphigeneia's reactions to Calchas's prophecy (lines 219-305; p. 9-11).

10/18:  Bring your hard copy of Unsworth to class.  You will have the period to read p. 95-136 in The Songs of the Kings.

10/17:  Bring your hard copy of Unsworth to class.  Discuss Aeschylus's drama, Agamemnon:  Dramatis Personae (p. 2); the Watchman who awaits a fire sign that the Trojan War has ended; the Chorus comments on the war (lines 1-58; p. 2-4).

10/15:  Bring your hard copy of Unsworth to class.

10/11:  Bring your hard copy of Unsworth to class.

10/10:  Bring your hard copy of Unsworth to class.  Be prepared for a written reading quiz on p. 61-94 in Unsworth's The Songs of the Kings

10/9:  Bring your hard copy of Unsworth to class.  Extra help will occur from 11:40-12 in W110a.  When you arrive in class, you should have finished reading p. 61-94 in Unsworth's The Songs of the Kings.   If you ask good questions about the reading, I will delay the quiz until 10/10.  If you ask no questions, you will have the quiz today.  

10/8:  Bring your hard copy of Unsworth to class.  If you were absent from class on 10/1, 10/2, 10/3  and/or 10/7, you will have time complete your essay.  All other students will have the period to read Unsworth's The Songs of the Kings.

10/7:  Bring your hard copy of Unsworth to class.  Part 4 of Adaptation Essay 1:  On this day, you will finish writing your three body paragraphs and write your conclusion.  NOTE:  This will be the first of several in-class essays you will write this year, and there will not be a chance to revise it. 

10/4:  No classes. Feast of St. Francis observed.

10/3:  Bring your hard copy of Unsworth to class.  Part 3 of Adaptation Essay 1:  On this day, you will continue writing your three body paragraphs. NOTE:  This will be the first of several in-class essays you will write this year, and there will not be a chance to revise it.  

10/2:  Bring your hard copy of Unsworth to class.  Part 2 of Adaptation Essay 1:  On this day, you will work on your three body paragraphs.  Here are three topic sentences for the three paragraphs you should write; if you can remember these topic sentences, you are welcome to include them at the beginnings of your body paragraphs:  1) In The Iliad, Homer uses indirect characterization to portray the active role that the gods play in the Trojan war, while in Troy, no gods appear, and Benioff uses the same technique to portray extreme religious faith as a potential cause for irrational decisions.  2) Homer also uses indirect characterization to portray the ancient Greek belief that honor, courage and integrity are more important than power, while Benioff uses the same technique to portray leaders who pursue power with no apparent sense of honor, integrity or moral conscience.  3) Moreover, Homer uses indirect characterization to portray the ancient Greek belief that honor, courage and integrity are more important than romantic love, while Benioff uses the same technique to portray characters who selfishly and shamelessly pursue their romantic desires at all costs.   NOTE:  This will be the first of several in-class essays you will write this year, and there will not be a chance to revise it.  

10/1:  Bring your hard copy of Unsworth to class.  Quotation Page Due (10 points):  When you arrive in class on this day, you should hand me a piece of paper with 12 quotations (6 from The Iliad and 6 from Troy).  On this piece of paper, the only text should be your name, the 12 quotations, and the names of the people who say each quotation. If there is anything else written on the paper, I cannot accept it and you will lose points. You should place the quotations in the order you will use them in your argumentative essay, following the structure of the topic sentences that I have provided (see the notes listed for 10/2 above).  (For the paragraph on the gods, you should begin with 2 quotations from The Iliad and move to 2 quotations from Troy. Then for the paragraph on the honor versus power, you should begin with 2 quotations from The Iliad and move to 2 quotations from Troy. Then for the paragraph on the honor versus romantic love, you should begin with 2 quotations from The Iliad and move to 2 quotations from Troy.) After I have collected your quotation pages, we will do some final review in preparation for Adaptation Essay 1. Then you will commence Part 1 of Adaptation Essay 1:  With the last twenty minutes of class, you will write the introductory paragraph of your essay, and you may begin your first body paragraph if you have time.  

9/30:  Bring your hard copy of Unsworth to class. Be prepared for a written reading quiz on p. 36-54 in Unsworth's The Songs of the Kings. (You can stop reading on p. 54 when Agamemnon says, "We will also hear Croton and any others who have a mind to speak.")  Also:  After the quiz, we will begin reviewing for Adaptation Essay 1.

9/27:  SFP Walkathon.

9/26:  Bring your hard copy of Unsworth to class.  You will have time to read Unsworth (next quiz, 9/30) and / or work on your quotation page (due 10/1).  

9/25:  Bring your hard copy of Unsworth's The Songs of the Kings to class.  You will have time to read Unsworth (next quiz, 9/30) and / or work on your quotation page (due 10/1).  

9/24:  Background in Ancient Greek Drama.

9/23:  Background in Ancient Greek Drama.  Be prepared for a written reading quiz on p. 18-35 in Unsworth's The Songs of the Kings.  (On p. 18, you should start reading at the paragraph that begins, "When all this was done...").

9/20:  Background in Ancient Greek Drama.  Go to our course webpage, click "Files," and then locate the document titled, "Excerpts from Unsworth's The Songs of the Kings."  Open the document, go to page 18, and start reading at the paragraph that begins, "When all this was done..."  Read p. 18 through 35 in preparation for the reading quiz that is scheduled for Monday, 9/23.

9/19:  By the time you arrive at class on this day, you should be prepared for a written quiz on the "Excerpts from Homer's The Iliad" (posted under "Files").

9/18:  Background in Ancient Greek Drama. 

9/17:  Full Period Guidance Presentation. As usual, make sure you are on time to class!

9/16:  Background in Ancient Greek Drama.  Hand in a printout showing that you have ordered our 3 books (including your name, date of purchase, titles of books, etc.), and you will earn 3 out of 5 on your first homework assignment.

9/13:  Quiet Work Period:  Go to our course webpage, click "Files," and then locate the documents titled, "The Trojan War: Before, During and After," "Excerpts from Homer's The Iliad," and "Excerpts from Benioff's Troy."  You should reread the first of these documents, which we looked at in class, and you should then read the second and third documents, taking notes about the similarities and differences you observe in Homer's and Benioff's portrayals of the heroes of the Trojan War.  Your observations will ultimately find expression in an argumentative essay about the contrasting ways that writers such as Homer, Benioff and Unsworth have chosen to represent these heroes. Characters you should take particular notice of as you read are Agamemnon, Menelaus, Odysseus, Achilles, Hector, and Paris/Helen.  If you have any time left over, you should begin reading the first play we will read, Aeschylus's drama, Agamemnon.    

9/12:  Background in Ancient Greek Drama.  Hand in a printout showing that you have ordered our 3 books (including your name, date of purchase, titles of books, etc.), and you will earn 5 out of 5 on your first homework assignment.

9/11:  Background in Ancient Greek Drama.  Hand in a printout showing that you have ordered our 3 books (including your name, date of purchase, titles of books, etc.), and you will earn 8 out of 5 on your first homework assignment.

9/10:  Background in Ancient Greek Drama.  Hand in a printout showing that you have ordered our 3 books (including your name, date of purchase, titles of books, etc.), and you will earn 10 out of 5 on your first homework assignment.

9/9:  Background in Ancient Greek Drama. Hand in a printout showing that you have ordered our 3 books (including your name, date of purchase, titles of books, etc.), and you will earn 10 out of 5 on your first homework assignment.

9/6:  Introductions (Seat Assignments, Course Webpage, 3 Books to Acquire / Extra Credit Opportunity!, College Credit, MySFP). 

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