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1/16: Final Exam, Part 2 (worth 10% of your final grade in this course).  During this period, you will write two body paragraphs on the other novel as well as a concluding paragraph.  Each body paragraph should analyze the literary devices the author uses to portray the moral merits or shortcomings of a particular character. 

1/15:  Final Exam, Part 1 (worth 10% of your final grade in this course).  During this period, you will write an introductory paragraph as well as two body paragraphs on the first novel you have chosen to write about.  Each body paragraph should analyze the literary devices the author uses to portray the moral merits or shortcomings of a particular character.  NOTE 1:  Since you will be writing two body paragraphs on each of the two novels we have discussed, you will be writing four topic sentences in your essay.  Here are two model topic sentences, and if you can remember them, you are welcome to incorporate them into your essay:  1) Suzuki uses direct and indirect characterization to portray Asakawa as someone who lacks empathy for the feelings and experiences of others but who has the moral impulse to protect not only himself but also his family at all costs.  2) Palahniuk uses direct and indirect characterization and symbolism to portray Carl Streator as someone who is horrified by his past behavior and who spends the rest of his life seeking redemption by eradicating the culling song and pursuing John Nash.

1/14:  Bring Lullaby and Ring.  Review for your Final Exam.  Come to class with any questions you may have.

1/11:   Before the start of class, EMAIL mlorenz@sfponline.org A COPY of your Palahniuk essay evidence COPIED-AND-PASTED INTO THE BODY OF THE EMAIL (DO NOT SEND ME AN ATTACHMENT OR LINK), which should include a minimum of 4 QUOTATIONS for each of the following 3 characters:  Helen, Carl and Oyster.  Each example must include a quotation, a page number and a 3+ sentence explanation of what the example shows about the character's morality.   I REPEAT:  FOR EACH SCENE, A QUOTE, A PAGE NUMBER, AND A 3-OR-MORE SENTENCE EXPLANATION OF HOW THE EXAMPLE SHOWS THE CHARACTER'S MORAL MERITS OR SHORTCOMINGS (25 points).  There are two kinds of evidence you might consider using:  character actions that we observe in the specific scenes in the book or backstories we learn about the characters either through flashbacks or hearsay.  

1/10:  Bring Lullaby.

1/9:  Bring Lullaby.

1/8:  Bring Lullaby.  Be prepared for a written and / or scantron reading quiz on the remainder of Lullaby (p. 181-260). The five characters you should know for the scantron portion are the five main characters: Carl, Helen, Mona, Oyster and John Nash.

1/7:  Bring Lullaby.

1/4:  Bring Lullaby.

1/3:  Bring Lullaby.  Be prepared for a written and / or scantron reading quiz on chapters fifteen through and including twenty-nine in Palahniuk's Lullaby(p. 81-179).  For this quiz, you should of course know the names and doings of the four main characters, Carl Streator, Helen Hoover Boyle, Mona Sabbat and Oyster, who appear in just about every chapter in the second installment of the novel.  (Mona and Oyster begin to appear with great frequency beginning with Ch. 17.)  In addition, there are ten minor characters who I would like you to know, and they are:  1) Basil Frankie (Ch. 15, p. 85); 2) John Nash (Ch. 16, p. 89-92; Ch. 24, p. 147; Ch. 25, p. 154); 3) Badger and his parrot (Ch. 17, p. 97 and 103); 4) the Sarge (Ch. 18 and 27); 5) the Roadkill Jesus Christ (Ch. 18); 6) Rhonda, wearing an apron with little chickens, and her interactions with Helen (Ch. 20, p. 120-124); 7) Patrick and 8) John Boyle, Helen’s son and husband (Ch. 21, p. 125-129); 9) Gustave Brennan and his connection to Helen’s second job (Ch. 22, p. 138 and Ch. 24, p. 147); and 10) the man with little race car boxing shorts (Ch. 28).

12/21:  No classes.

12/20:  Bring Lullaby.

12/19:  Bring Lullaby.

12/18:  Bring Lullaby.

12/17:  Bring Lullaby.

12/14:  Bring Lullaby.

12/13:  Bring Lullaby.

12/12:  Bring Lullaby.

12/11:  Bring Lullaby.  Be prepared for a written and / or scantron quiz on chapters one through and including fourteen in Palahniuk's Lullaby (p. 1-79).  The characters names you should memorize from these pages (and the chapters and pages upon which these characters appear) are as follows:  The narrator, Carl Streator; Helen Hoover Boyle (Prologue, 1-6; Ch. 5, 27-32; Ch. 6, 35; Ch. 8, 48; Ch. 9, 49-54; Ch. 10, 57 and 60; Ch. 13, 70-71); Mona Sabbat (Prologue, 2-6; Ch. 5, 27-32; Ch. 14, 73-79); Duncan (Ch. 2, 13; Ch. 4, 23; Ch. 6, 34-37; Ch. 7, 40 and 42 and 44; Ch. 10, 55-56; Ch. 13, 68); John Nash (Ch. 4, 25; Ch. 6, 34; Ch. 8, 45-48; Ch. 9, 57; Ch. 12, 63-65); Owners of the Exeter House and of Stuart Western Technologies, Baker Lewis Stuart and Penny Price Stuart (Ch. 5, 29-32; End of Ch. 7 and 8, 44-48); Henderson (Ch. 7, 39-41; Ch. 10, 55-56 and 58; Ch. 13, 69); Weltraud Wagner (Ch. 10, 56-57).

12/10:  Bring Lullaby.

12/7:  No classes.

12/6:  Bring Lullaby.

12/5:  Part 2 of your Q2 Sudden Death Essay:  On this day, you will write your two body paragraph discussion of the second of the two stories you have chosen to analyze as well as your conclusion.   NOTE:  This will be the second of three in-class essays you will write this semester, and there will not be a chance to revise it.  Also:  Bring Lullaby.

12/4:  Part 1 of your Q2 Sudden Death Fiction Essay:  On this day, you will write your introduction as well as your two body paragraph discussion of the first of the two stories you have chosen to analyze.  As this is your first essay, I will also give you one topic sentence for each of the three stories from which you have to choose.  NOTE:  This will be the second of three in-class essays you will write this semester, and there will not be a chance to revise it.  NOTE 2:  Since you will be writing two body paragraphs on each of the two stories you have chosen, you will be writing four topic sentences in your essay.  Here are three model topic sentences, and if you can remember them, you are welcome to incorporate the two that pertain to the stories you have chosen:  1) O'Connor uses direct and indirect characterization to portray the selfish qualities of the grandmother and her family, and this selfishness may be as much to blame for their fates as the series of unlucky accidents that propel the story.  2) Dubus uses direct and indirect characterization to portray the tension between Kenneth’s childlike attitudes and Connie’s hidden vices, and this tension may be as much to blame for Douglas’s death as the .22 rifle with which Kenneth kills “the prowler.”  3) Atwood uses direct and indirect characterization to portray the tensions between Lucy’s fearless, careless ways and Lois’s concern for her, and this tension makes the sudden disappearance and likely death of Lucy seem inevitable and haunting.

12/3:  Come to class with questions.  We will spend the class reviewing for your Q2 Sudden Death Fiction Essay.  

11/30:  Bring Lullaby.

11/29:  Bring Lullaby.

11/28:  Be prepared for a written and / or scantron reading quiz on Atwood's "Death by Landscape."

11/19:  Be prepared for a written and / or scantron reading quiz on Dubus's "The Intruder."

11/15:  Be prepared for a written and / or scantron reading quiz on O'Connor's "A Good Man Is Hard to Find."  

11/14:  Bring Lullaby by Chuck Palahniuk to class.  You will have the period to read.

11/13:  Hand in your Suzuki Evidence Homework (25 points):  For this homework, you will gather 12 quotations from Ring, accompanied by the page number where the quote appears and a 2 to 3 sentence explanation of what the example shows about the character's morality.  For this homework, 4 of your examples should show the moral merits, shortcomings and/or extenuating circumstances of Asakawa's behavior, 4 should show the moral merits, shortcomings and/or extenuating circumstances of Ryuji's behavior, and 4 should show the moral merits, shortcomings and/or extenuating circumstances of Sadako's behavior.

11/9:  Bring Ring.

11/8:  Bring Ring.

11/7:  Bring Ring. Be prepared for a scantron and written reading quiz on the remainder of Ring (p.171-282).  In addition to the main characters, Asakawa, Ryuji Takayama and Sadako Yamamura, the characters who you should know for the quiz are:  1) Yoshino (Pt3/Ch8, p. 171-185; Pt3/Ch9, p. 186 and 203-207); 2) Shizuko Yamamura (Pt3/Ch8, p. 172-175; Pt3/Ch9, p. 188-200); 3) Shin Arima (Pt3/Ch8, p.178-185); 4) Genji (Pt3/Ch9, p. 188-194); 5) Jotaro Nagao (Pt3/Ch10, p.211-212; Pt3/Ch11, p. 216-226; Pt3/Ch12, p. 231-234); and 6) Mai Takano (Pt4/Ch3, p. 264-266; Pt4/Ch4, p. 267-274).

11/6:  Bring Ring.  You will have the period to read.

11/5:  Bring Ring.

10/31:  Bring Ring.

10/30:  Bring Ring.

10/29:  Bring Ring.  Be prepared for a scantron and written reading quiz on Part Three, chapters 1 through and including 7, of Ring (p. 87-170). The characters who you should know for the scantron quiz are:  1) Asakawa; 2) Ryuji Takayama (Pt2/Ch1, p. 60-61 and all of Pt3 and Pt4); 3) Shizu (Pt3/Ch2, p. 97-99 and106-107; Pt3/Ch4, p. 121-123 and 133-139); 4) Yoshino (Pt3/Ch3, p. 109-110); 5) Oguri (Pt3/Ch3-4, 110-112 and p. 119); 6) Mrs. Kaneko (Pt3/Ch3, p. 114-118); 7) Mai Takano (Pt3/Ch4, p. 129-133); 8) Tetsuzo Miura (Pt3/Ch5, p. 147-158); 9) Sadako Yamamura (Pt3/Ch5, p. 157 and the remainder of Pt3 and Pt4); 10) Hayatsu (Pt3/Ch7). 

10/26:  Bring Ring.

10/25:  Bring Ring.

10/24:  Bring Ring.

10/23:  Bring Ring.

10/22:  Bring Ring.  Be prepared for a scantron and written reading quiz on Part One and Part Two of Ring (p.1-85).  The characters who you should know for the quiz are:  1) Tomoko (Pt1/Ch1, 3 and 5); 2) Kimura (Pt1/Ch1 and 2); 3) Asakawa; 4) Oguri (Pt1/Ch3); 5) Yoshino (Pt1/Ch4); 6) Shizu (Pt1/Ch6). 

10/19:  Bring Ring

10/18:  Bring Ring

10/15:  On this day, bring to class your hard copies of Ring (recently retitled, Rings) by Koji Suzuki and Lullaby by Chuck Palahniuk.  You can buy these books, borrow them from friends, or borrow them from the Prep library or your local library.  However, you are going to need to have these actual books in class on the days I say.  (Remember that I assigned this on 9/26, giving you three weeks to acquire the books.)

10/12:  Part 2 of your Q1 Epiphanic Fiction Essay:  On this day, you will write your two body paragraph discussion of the second of the two stories you have chosen to analyze as well as your conclusion.   NOTE:  This will be the first of three in-class essays you will write this semester, and there will not be a chance to revise it.

10/11:  Part 1 of your Q1 Epiphanic Fiction Essay:  On this day, you will write your introduction as well as your two body paragraph discussion of the first of the two stories you have chosen to analyze.  As this is your first essay, I will also give you one topic sentence for each of the three stories from which you have to choose.  You will be writing about two of these three stories, and if you can remember the two topic sentences that will be relevant to your essay, you can incorporate them into your essay verbatim.  The model topic sentences are as follows:  1) In "Cathedral," Carver uses tone to portray the narrator's initial narrow-mindedness as well as the transcendent epiphany that allows him to overcome his prejudices and broaden his understanding of life's possibilities.  2) In "Sonny's Blues," Baldwin uses external conflict to portray the narrator's initial judgments of his brother Sonny as well as the realist epiphany that allows him to appreciate Sonny's struggles and talents. 3) In "The Enormous Radio," Cheever uses internal conflict and symbolism to portray Irene's initial ignorance about the world as well as the realist epiphany that forces her to acknowledge the ugliness and immorality of the world, her marriage and herself.  NOTE:  This will be the first of three in-class essays you will write this semester, and there will not be a chance to revise it.

10/10:  No classes for seniors.  PSAT day.

10/9:  Come to class with questions.  We will spend the class reviewing for your Q1 Epiphanic Fiction Essay.  By the time you arrive at class, you should already have begun planning your essay structure and studying your examples from the two stories you have chosen from among the three epiphanic fiction authors (Carver, Baldwin and Cheever) we have discussed.

10/2:  Be prepared for written and / or scantron reading quiz on Cheever's "The Enormous Radio."  

10/1:  Hand in your assignment on Baldwin's use of symbolic imagery.  This assignment can be handwritten or typed, and each of the ten examples should be numbered and should contain the relevant quotations as well as 3 or more complete sentences interpreting the quotations and their significance in the story as a whole.  The assignment is worth 30 points, 1 point for the quotes that contain symbolic imagery and 2 points for the interpretation of each example. 

9/24:  Full Period Guidance Presentation, after I have taken attendance.

9/20:  Be prepared for a written and / or scantron reading quiz on the second half (p. 133-148) of Baldwin's "Sonny's Blues."  

9/18:  Be prepared for a written and / or scantron reading quiz on the first half (p. 122-133) of Baldwin's "Sonny's Blues."  

9/11:  Be prepared for a written and / scantron reading quiz on Carver's "Cathedral."

9/10:  1) Show me your printout of the course requirements, which should have your own signature as well as that of a parent/guardian. 2) Also, make sure you have your copy of "Bullet in the Brain" with you.  If you don't have it, you will be unprepared and lose points on your classwork grade.

9/7:  Introductions (College Credit; MySFP; Course Webpage; our novels for the semester, Ring by Koji Suzuki and Lullaby by Chuck Palahniuk).  Read "Bullet in the Brain" by Tobias Wolfe.

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