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5/8:  Final Exam Essay, Part 2 (this essay is worth 10% of your final grade):  On this day, you will write your last two body paragraphs as well as your conclusion.   Each body paragraph should focus on the empathy Patchett elicits from readers about a different captor/captive pair.  NOTE:  This will be the third of three in-class essays you will write this semester, and there will not be a chance to revise it.  To prepare for this in-class essay, you should memorize the quotations you will incorporate in support of your thesis.  In each body paragraph, you should include a minimum of three examples.  That means six or more examples that you will plan out and study before each day of writing. 

5/7:  Final Exam Essay, Part 1 (this essay is worth 10% of your final grade):  On this day, you will write your introduction as well as your first two body paragraphs.  Each body paragraph should focus on the empathy Patchett elicits from readers about a different captor/captive pair.  NOTE:  This will be the third of three in-class essays you will write this semester, and there will not be a chance to revise it.  To prepare for this in-class essay, you should memorize the quotations you will incorporate in support of your thesis.  In each body paragraph, you should include a minimum of three examples.  That means six or more examples that you will plan out and study before each day of writing.  Model Topic Sentence (which you are free to use if you can remember it):  Finally, Patchett uses the techniques of direct and indirect characterization and symbolism to create sympathy for Carmen, who exhibits hidden talents, a generous heart and a capacity for love that make her among the novels most endearing characters despite her role as a captor. 

5/6:  Bring Bel Canto!

5/3:  Bring Bel Canto!

5/2:  Bring Bel Canto!

5/1:  Bring Bel Canto!

4/30:  Bring Bel Canto!  Be prepared for a scantron reading quiz on the remainder of Bel Canto, including the "Epilogue" (p. 197-318). The characters whose actions and backstories you should be able to identify for this quiz are:  Ruben Iglesias, General Benjamin, Katsumi Hosokowa, Gen Watanabe, Simon Thibault, Roxane Coss, Cesar, Carmen and Beatriz.

4/29:  Bring Bel Canto!  Be prepared for a written reading quiz on the remainder of Bel Canto, including the "Epilogue" (p. 197-318).

4/17:  Bring Bel Canto!

4/16:  Bring Bel Canto!

A, 4/15:  Bring Bel Canto!  All Extra Credit YouTube videos are due on this day; you must be prepared to show yours to the class.  Group 1 (Bak, Alex B., Danny C., Ryan S. and Mark T.) presents on O’Brien’s short story, “The Things They Carried,” which is one of the stories in a larger story collection with the same title.  All students except those presenting today should be prepared for a quiz on today's presentation story.

F, 4/15:  Bring Bel Canto!  All Extra Credit YouTube videos are due on this day; you must be prepared to show yours to the class.  Group 1 (Nino G., Brian H., Nick K. and Ryan Martin) presents on O’Brien’s short story, “The Things They Carried,” which is one of the stories in a larger story collection with the same title.  All students except those presenting today should be prepared for a quiz on today's presentation story.

A, 4/11:  Group 3 (Jade A., Fio A., Chrissy D. and Tenzin D.) presents on Jackson’s “The Lottery” and Group 2 (Acelynn N., Raquel R., Elijah S. and Maurisa S.) presents on Faulkner’s “A Rose for Emily.”  All students should be prepared for a quiz on today's presentation stories.  Jackson presenters should be prepared for a quiz on Faulkner, and Faulkner presenters should be prepared for a quiz on Jackson.  

F, 4/11:  Group 2 (Alicia M., Parfait, James R. and Micaela S.) presents on O’Connor’s “Everything That Rises Must Converge.”  All students except those presenting today should be prepared for a quiz on today's presentation story.

A, 4/10:  Group 5 (Antonio C., Nestor K., Ethan K. and Gio L.) presents on Lawrence’s “The Rocking Horse Winner.”  All students except those presenting today should be prepared for a quiz on today's presentation story.

F, 4/10:  Group 3 (Alex D., Singh, Angelica V. and Alyssa W.) presents on Oates’s “Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?”  All students except those presenting today should be prepared for a quiz on today's presentation story.

A, 4/9:  Group 4 (Brigette H., Jiaying H., Mandy L. and Iris W.) presents on Oates’s “Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?”  All students except those presenting today should be prepared for a quiz on today's presentation story.

F, 4/9:  Group 5 (Ethan C., Ryan McDonough, and Richard Y.) presents on Jackson’s “The Lottery” and Group 4 (Rojani C., Ronide G., MJ M. and Makayla S.) presents on Faulkner’s “A Rose for Emily.”  All students should be prepared for a quiz on today's presentation stories.  Jackson presenters should be prepared for a quiz on Faulkner, and Faulkner presenters should be prepared for a quiz on Jackson. 

A, 4/8:  Prepare for your group presentation.

F, 4/8:  Group 6 (Dylan A., Ivana A., Mark B. and Sarah C.) presents on Lawrence’s “The Rocking Horse Winner.”  All students except those presenting today should be prepared for a quiz on today's presentation story.

4/5:  Prepare for your group presentation.

4/4:  Prepare for your group presentation.

4/3:  Prepare for your group presentation.

4/2:  Be prepared for a scantron reading quiz on chapters four through and including six of Bel Canto (p. 105-196).  NOTE:   The characters whose actions and backstories you should be able to identify for this quiz are:  Cesar, Beatriz, Carmen, Oscar Mendoza, Tetsuya Kato, General Benjamin (p. 136-37), Father Arguedas, General Alfredo (p. 150-53), and Victor Fyodorov.

4/1:  Be prepared for a written reading quiz on chapters four through and including six of Bel Canto (p. 105-196). 

3/28:  Be prepared for a written reading quiz on the short story that I have assigned to you and your group. 

3/22:  Part 2 of your Sudden Death Fiction Essay:  On this day, you will write your two body paragraph discussion of the second of the two stories you have chosen to analyze as well as your conclusion.   NOTE:  This will be the second of three in-class essays you will write this semester, and there will not be a chance to revise it.

3/21:  Part 1 of your Sudden Death Fiction Essay:  On this day, you will write your introduction as well as your two body paragraph discussion of the first of the two stories you have chosen to analyze.  I will also give you one topic sentence for each of the three stories from which you have to choose.  You will be writing about two of these three stories, and if you can remember the two topic sentences that will be relevant to your essay, you can incorporate them into your essay verbatim.  The model topic sentences are as follows:  1) O'Connor uses direct and indirect characterization to portray the selfish qualities of the grandmother and _____, which create anticipation for and contribute to their sudden deaths at the climax of the story.  2) Dubus uses direct and indirect characterization to portray Kenneth’s naïve innocence and Connie’s secretive vices, which create anticipation for and contribute to Douglas’s sudden death at the climax of the story. 3) Atwood uses direct and indirect characterization to portray Lucy’s jaded carelessness and Lois’s worry, which create anticipation for Lucy’s sudden death and show Lois’s psychological need to hold on to her.  NOTE:  This will be the second of three in-class essays you will write this semester, and there will not be a chance to revise it.  

3/12:  Be prepared for a written and / or scantron reading quiz on Atwood's "Death by Landscape."

3/8:  Be prepared for a written and / or scantron reading quiz on Dubus's "The Intruder."

3/5:  Be prepared for a written and / or scantron reading quiz on O'Connor's "A Good Man Is Hard to Find."

2/28:  Bring Bel Canto.

2/27:  Bring Bel Canto.  Be prepared for a 30-point matching column quiz on chapters one through and including three (p. 1-103) of Bel Canto.  The characters whose actions and backstories you should be able to identify for this quiz are:   Roxane Coss, Katsumi Hosokowa, Gen Watanabe, Simon Thibault, Edith Thibault, Ruben Iglesias, Eduardo Masuda, Maria, Joachim Messner, Esmeralda, Father Arguedas, and Monsignor Rolland.  

2/26:  Bring Bel Canto.  Be prepared for a written quiz on chapters one through and including three (p. 1-103) of Bel Canto.

2/25:  Bring Bel Canto

2/15:  Bring Bel Canto.  On this day and on every day afterwards that I tell you to have Bel Canto in class, you will lose 5 points on your classwork grade if you are not in class with the book by the time the bell rings. 

2/14:  Bring your hard copy of Bel Canto by Ann Patchett.  If you bring the book on this day, you will earn 5/5 on the homework for 2/14.  Part 2 of your Epiphanic Fiction Essay:  On this day, you will write your two body paragraph discussion of the second of the two stories you have chosen to analyze as well as your conclusion.   NOTE:  This will be the first of three in-class essays you will write this semester, and there will not be a chance to revise it.

2/13:  Part 1 of your Epiphanic Fiction Essay:  On this day, you will write your introduction as well as your two body paragraph discussion of the first of the two stories you have chosen to analyze.  As this is your first essay, I will also give you one topic sentence for each of the three stories from which you have to choose.  You will be writing about two of these three stories, and if you can remember the two topic sentences that will be relevant to your essay, you can incorporate them into your essay verbatim.  The model topic sentences are as follows:  1) In "Cathedral," Carver uses tone to portray the narrator's initial narrow-mindedness as well as the transcendent epiphany that allows him to overcome his prejudices and broaden his understanding of life's possibilities.  2) In "The Enormous Radio," Cheever uses internal conflict and symbolism to portray Irene's initial ignorance about the world as well as the realist epiphany that forces her to acknowledge the ugliness and immorality of the world, her marriage and herself.  3) In "Angel Levine," Malamud uses external conflict to portray Manischevitz's initial narrow-mindedness as well as the magical realist epiphany that allows him to overcome his prejudices and glimpse the miraculous possibilities of human existence.  NOTE:  This will be the first of three in-class essays you will write this semester, and there will not be a chance to revise it.

2/12:  Come to class with questions.  We will spend some more time reviewing for your Epiphanic Fiction Essay.  

2/11:  Come to class with questions.  We will spend the class reviewing for your Epiphanic Fiction Essay.  By the time you arrive at class, you should already have begun planning your essay structure and studying your examples from the two stories you have chosen from among the three epiphanic fiction authors (Carver, Cheever and Malamud) we have discussed.

2/8:  Bring to class your hard copy of Bel Canto by Ann Patchett.  If you bring the book on this day, you will earn 8/5 on the homework for 2/14.

2/5:  Be prepared for written and / or scantron reading quiz on Malamud's "Angel Levine."  

1/30:  Be prepared for written and / or scantron reading quiz on Cheever's "The Enormous Radio."  

1/24:  Be prepared for a written and / or scantron reading quiz on Carver's "Cathedral."

1/23: Make sure you have your copy of "Bullet in the Brain" with you.  If you don't have it, you will be unprepared and lose points on your classwork grade.

1/22:  Introductions (College Credit; MySFP; Course Webpage; our novel for the semester, Bel Canto by Ann Patchett).  Read "Bullet in the Brain" by Tobias Wolfe.

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