School Library
World War II and the Holocaust

World War II and the Holocaust:

The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
http://www.ushmm.org/
The Holocaust Memorial Museum is in Washington, D.C. (and well worth a visit) – luckily, they have a fantastic website as well.  This is, by far, one of the best Holocaust research destinations on the internet.  They have a full encyclopedia, lots of current news that’s updated regularly, photos and information from their exhibits, links to academic journals, research databases, and more.  It really is like having a full library about the Holocaust right at your fingertips.

Yad Vashem
http://www.yadvashem.org.il/
In a nutshell, this is the Israeli government’s Holocaust Memorial Museum.  It is equally comprehensive, but with a slightly different focus.  For instance, it contains fewer scholarly articles and research, but many more pictures (including photos of the Warsaw ghettos) and a massive database of victims’ names.

Virtual Tour of Auschwitz
http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/interactive/animations/auschwitz_map/index_embed.shtml
From the BBC, this is a very detailed, eay to understand interactive video tour of a concentration camp.  It begins with a general overview of where concentration camps were, and how they operated within Europe.  Then it zeros in on Auschwitz and allows you to explore.  You should note that the BBC's general history website for World War II (which you can get to from this tour) is also very helpful and full of information. 

German Propaganda Archive
http://www.calvin.edu/academic/cas/gpa/
The most comprehensive collection of German propaganda (posters, speeches, newspaper articles, cartoons, etc, etc, etc) out there. Period.  The website spans all of German history, but the WWII section is extremely comprehensive.  Even if you don’t need this to answer your research question, it is well worth flipping through.

Historical Atlas of the 20th Century
http://users.erols.com/mwhite28/20centry.htm
Are you a visual learner?  This online atlas is all about interactive, animated maps that show everything from the intensity of fighting and numbers of casualties in WWII to the spread of fascism and the displacement of European residents.  This is not a one-stop shop for research, but if you like maps, it’s a great way to pull together some of the statistics and facts you read about elsewhere.

Holocaust: the Untold Story from the Newseum
http://www.newseum.org/holocaust/shock/shock.htm
The Newseum is an online museum about news, and this interactive online exhibit is a collection of their news resources about the Holocaust.  Be careful though, it is a lot of animation and graphics; it might crash your browser.

Last Expression: Art and Auschwitz
http://lastexpression.northwestern.edu/index2_frameset.html
From an exhibit at Northwestern University, this online gallery contains art made at Auschwitz, from both survivors and victims.  It is haunting, disturbing, and very moving.

World War II Resources
http://www.ibiblio.org/pha/
Dedicated to primary sources (diaries, speeches, newspaper articles from the time period, etc.), this is a great way to find out exactly what people were saying, writing, and seeing during WWII.  Two caveats: this website isn’t updated regularly anymore, and hasn’t been for a couple of years.  There might be broken links.  Also, this dates back to the old days of the internet, before websites looked as nice as we’re all accustomed to now.  So it’s a little hard to navigate; the links are just in a giant list.  However, it’s worth wading through for some great primary sources.

United Nations Treaty Collection
http://treaties.un.org/Home.aspx
Forgot how it ends?  This is exactly what it sounds like, but it gives a lot of great background information (as well as the full text) for treaties throughout history.

Finding Dulcinea: Learning About the Holocaust
http://www.findingdulcinea.com/info/holocaust-resources.html
The first few sections of this website won’t show you anything new, but the "Legacy of the Holocaust" box has links to a lot of interesting media (interviews, pictures, news articles) you might not find on other websites.

The Museum of Online Museums
http://www.coudal.com/moom/
Not only are libraries moving their collections online, museums are too.  The Museum of Online Museums, as you might guess, collects many of these museums in a handy list.  Obviously not all of this is Holocaust related, but there are quite a few online museums listed here that you will find useful, including a bunch of museums in other countries.  There are even very small, focused museums, such as the Museum of German Propaganda and the Museum of German Television Test Patterns.

last update: 11/30/2010 12:47:05 PM